Cosmetic Surgeon on Facelift Surgery

Cosmetic Surgeon on Facelift Surgery

Aging is an inevitable part of life—and no part of your body bears the brunt of the wear of time more than your face does. Sun exposure, stress, even gravity itself, all contribute to the ways the skin on our faces changes and loses its elasticity as we grow older; and it shows, in the creases around the nose and mouth that gradually grow deeper, in the jowls that begin to drop down from your jawline, and in the folds that increasingly appear on your neck as years go by.
Facelifts provide a means of combating these telltale signs of aging. In a surgical procedure that generally takes a few hours, the excess fat in your face and neck is removed, muscles underneath the surface are tightened, and sagging skin is redraped to give you a more youthful look.
During a traditional facelift procedure, I move back and forth between the two sides of the face as I work to ensure symmetrical results. I generally begin the incision just above the hairline at the temples, continue down in front of the ears, then continue underneath the earlobe to the lower scalp, and then begin the process of tightening and reshaping. Where and how incisions are made in a given procedure, however, can change depending upon a patient’s facial structure.
Typically I have achieved the best results in patients who are experiencing some sagging or droopiness but have well-defined facial bone structure and some elasticity left in their skin. For the most part, this means patients in their forties to sixties; but a successful facelift surgery can be performed on someone in their seventies, or even eighties, in some cases.
I try to inform my patients as thoroughly as possible about what to expect with a facelift, both on my website and in consultations. I’m always careful to prepare my patients for the fact that the face they see in the mirror immediately following surgery is probably not going to be a very pleasant one: the face will be puffy and bruised-looking, which can distort features, and the incision lines will be apparent until they heal, which will take at least a couple of weeks.
Dubbed the “weekend” facelift by some, a short scar facelift (also called an S-lift, MACS lift, Minimal Incision facelift, or Mini facelift) is an alternative to the traditional facelift that is appealing to many because it requires only light anesthesia and is performed with smaller incisions, which lends to a faster recovery time. To call it a “weekend” lift is a bit of a misnomer, however—even with a short scar procedure, a patient still needs 10 to 12 days to heal to the point at which they can return to work. It’s also important to keep in mind that short scar facelifts primarily improve the mid-face area; to address droopiness in the jaw or neck areas, you might need to pursue a full facelift.
If you’re considering a facelift, you’re not alone—it’s a very popular cosmetic procedure. According to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, over 100,000 facelifts were performed in 2009 alone. You can’t turn back the hands of time; but a facelift is a safe, proven procedure that can combat the negative aesthetic effects of aging and make you look years younger.

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